Fostamatinib in chronic immune thrombocytopenia: No comparison—added benefit not proven

Fostamatinib is approved for the treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenia in adults who are refractory to other treatments (in particular to treatment with corticosteroids). The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) examined in an early benefit assessment whether fostamatinib offers an added benefit for these patients in comparison with eltrombopag or […]

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Testing for a lipoprotein linked to heart risk is as effective as blood work

Elevated levels of a little-known lipoprotein in the blood that may put people at high risk of cardiovascular disease can be as accurately detected by genetic testing as by conventional laboratory measurement, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found. In a study published in JAMA Cardiology, the team reported that genetic risk scoring of […]

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Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers

Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations—which seems to happen whether or not […]

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Exploring the golden hour: Delays in trauma treatment linked to disability and death

Some clinicians consider that after a traumatic injury, patients are most likely to survive if they receive medical treatment within one hour—the so-called “golden hour.” A new study led by Chiang Wen-Chu at National Taiwan University Hospital, Yunlin Branch, and published October 6th, 2020 in PLOS Medicine, explores that idea, finding that longer delays in […]

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A simple enrollment change yields big dividends in children’s early learning program

Researchers know that texting programs can greatly benefit young children’s literacy. Now new research shows that parents’ participation in such programs can be boosted exponentially with one simple tweak: automatic enrollment, combined with the ability to opt out. The new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University’s Sanford School of […]

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